Not That Terrible

Home School Standards,” by Chad M. Shuldt, Clean Cut Kid, http://www.cleancutkid.com/index.php?id=102, 28 December 2004.

Should more be done for our public schools?,” by Chad M. Shuldt, tdaxp, http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2004/12/26/attacking_success.html, 28 December 2004.

Commenting on a recent post here, Chad M. Shuldt says

This comes down to a question of accountability. Should home-schooled students be subject to the same standards as public-schooled students? I would ask why should they not be?

Expounding on this on his blog, he repeats

Home-schooling presents a great option for parents, and I know several people that have done it. However, I have often wondered why there is no real accountability when a child is home schooled. The extent to which parents are upholding their responsibility in a home-school situation needs to be measured somehow. It comes down to accountability and responsibility.

Should home-schools be more like public-schools? Only if we want to be more like Tunisia.

Our public schools are terrible. Is this the fault of parents? Teachers? Principals? Politicians? I’m not interested in blame-games. Clearly we have a systemic failure in public education. We are approaching the problem in the wrong way, and getting terrible results for our efforts.

Public schools must be more like home-schools. They must be more accountable to parents. They must be more agile and more competitive. They must not be owned by unions and politicians.

American public schools are unacceptably terrible. Asking if home-schools should be as good as U.S. public school twists reality.

Home schools are great friends of education reform. They are a cannibalizing agents. Their success tells the rest of the educational world “be more like us.” Why should we punish success and reward failure? Why waste effort burdening successful schools with the same regulations which have dragged down the rest?

To those who claim to care about accountability: why are you not holding public schools accountable? Every moment you slow down education reform, every roadblock you build against new educational methods, every regulation you burden those who do not accept “better than Tunisia” with, saves public schools from accountability. The bankruptcy of the current system is exposed. Millions of students waste away in useless mush mills every school day. And Kooistra’s proposed reforms would only build the prison walls higher.

Why should home schools not be held to the same standards as public schools? Because home schools should not be that terrible.

0 thoughts on “Not That Terrible”

  1. Should home schools (is there such a thing?) be more like public schools?

    No. They shouldn't be. They serve the similar purpose of educating children, but serve other purposes that are very different.

    But that isn't the question. The question is whether or not parents are going to be held responsible for their children's education. Like I said on my blog, these parents want the benefits of a public school education like extra-curricular activities, but they don't want to be held to the same standards that No Child Left Behind requires. I just find it to be very hypocritical.

  2. “Like I said on my blog, these parents want the benefits of a public school education like extra-curricular activities, but they don't want to be held to the same standards that No Child Left Behind requires.”

    Chad – it's not hypocritical at all. Standardized tests are a rational response to a system that is failing, like public schools are failing. However, it doesn't make sense for systems that are succeeding, like home schooling is succeeding.

    Fix what's broken. Don't fix what works. That's all the parents are saying.

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