Genetic-Politics Papers Among UNL’s Most Downloaded

The October 2006 list of top downloads from UNL’s Digital Commons is out. Among them are many articles from the recent Hendricks Symposium on Genetics and Political Behavior, which preceded the recent Nerabska Lecture on Genes, Behavior, and Politics. While the list is distorted because many people picked up paper copies instead of downloading digital ones, the most downloaded ones include:

26 Genetic Configurations of Political Phenomena: New Theories, New Methods
43 The Neuroeconomics of Trust
54 The Neural Basis of Representative Democracy
55 Balancing Ambition and Gender Among Decision Makers
59 When Can Politicians Scare Citizens Into Supporting Bad Policies? A Theory of Incentives With Fear Based Content
60 Effects of “In-Your-Face” Television Discourse on Perceptions of a Legitimate Opposition
63 ‘Heroism’ in Warfare
67 The Genetic Basics of Political Cooperation
69 Personality and Emotional Response: Strategic and Tactical Responses to Changing Political Circumstances
76 Testosterone, Cortisol, and Aggression in a Simulated Crisis Game
90 Evolutionary Model of Racial Attitude Formation Socially Shared and Idiosyncratic Racial Attitudes
93 Empathy and Collective Action in the Prisoner’s Dilemma
104 Audience Effects on Moralistic Punishment
109 The Political Consequences of Perceived Threat and Felt Insecurity
127 Ecological Analysis of a System of Organized Interests
132 Judgments about cooperators and freeriders on a Shuar work team: An evolutionary psychological perspective

Read them. They’re good. The rest are online, too.

4 thoughts on “Genetic-Politics Papers Among UNL’s Most Downloaded”

  1. RevG,

    Sam Cannon's paper “The Aggridant Gene” seems somewhat… quirky. Did you want a comment on that?

    I think Maslow's statement was interesting, and it's good to hear him recognize that his hierarchy of needs is influenced by genetics and is not just socially constructed.

    What I think would be more interesting if we find genetic variation in one need is the highest between people or, even, groups.

  2. This just came up on my radar screen and I wanted to take note of your idea: “…if we find genetic variation in one need is the highest between people or, even, groups.” This relates to Obama’s use of “mutt” in describing himself. Already there are complaints from those who don’t have ‘hybrid vigor’ in their concept vocabularies. I would wager that ‘mutt’ is memetic.

  3. Sam,

    This relates to Obama’s use of “mutt” in describing himself. Already there are complaints from those who don’t have ‘hybrid vigor’ in their concept vocabularies. I would wager that ‘mutt’ is memetic.

    I hope so!

    Miscegenation became a dirty word in the 1860s, but there’s no reason for it to be. It certainly wasn’t so historically. [2]

    [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miscegenation#Etymological_history
    [2] http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2008/11/07/miscegenation-in-american-politics.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *