Steve DeAngelis on the Sysadmin-Industrial-Complex

Stephen DeAngelis, CEO of Enterra Solutions, says that the government should expand the safety net for contractors in Iraq. I agree completely. Besides being the morally right thing to do, such an expansion would strengthen the sysadmin-industrial complex, that iron triangle of contractors, congress, and government workers needed to keep shrinking the gap.

Outside the Beltway isn’t so happy with the scheme. OTB’s argument is just as honorable as those who argued we should not care for Vietnam veterans, because they opposed that war. Opponents of shrinking the gap naturally oppose real care for veterans (public-service or private-service), because they correctly recognize that care institutionally supports the broader mission. (Read the comments at Outside the Beltway for less polite formulations of the anti-veteran line.)

Evolving Humans, but to what end?

Humanity, like all species, evolves through changes in the frequency of genetic variants over time. Where there is less diversity — less possible genetic variants to have their frequency varied — there is less evolution. The aboriginies of Austarlia, for example, are dark skinned in spite of living at a mid-lattitute for thousands of years. This does not mean that there is some health advantage to being dark skinned at a mid latitute — quite the opposite! Rather, there simple was not enough diversity in the the population of aborginies to enable evolution over that time frame.

Populations with greater diversity are able to evolve faster for their conditions. Thus, it is slightly horrifying than the region with the worst living conditions (where selection pressures are least like those of the developed world)

tdaxps_new_map_md
The Long War for Africa and Islam

and the region with the highest birthrates:

is also the region with the most genetic diversity: Africa.

Extrapolating from other species, behavioral change from natural selection might occur in human beings in as little as 200 years. We are approximately fifty years into the Declonization of Africa, and the genocidal nightmare that unleasehd.

Forgetting about the actual human cost of this gappish hell, there is still time to be patient. There is time to let a plan work to shrink the gap.

But it must begin soon.