Tibet should remain a part of China

Tibet should not be split from the rest of China. This is why the Communist Party should start the groundwork for welcoming back the Dalai Lama as the Head of State of Tibet. This is why all people who support China should support the Olympic protests.

The Flag of the Tibetan Government-in-Exile

It’s clear that China has done a lot for Tibet. As Catholicgauze notes, Tibet was historically “feudalistic with large ungoverned spaces featuring roaming bands of thieves.” Tibet is much richer today, and the recent completion of a train to Tibet promises even more economic intercourse with the outside world. Further, a quick look at the map shows that Tibet’s neighborhood is home to former-Soviet dictatorships, states suffering Maoist insurgencies, and general misery. Tibet is safer inside China than outside China.

Sadly, the Communist Part is now China’s greatest enemy in Tibet. Bursting into monasteries, killing monks, beating civilians, and behaving in a disproportionate, unsophisticated, and stupid way to the Tibet “314” Uprising. The Communist Party’s 1970s-era tactics of violence and intimidation are appropriate for a backwards country, like China was under Mao Zedong. They are increasingly dangerous for a developed country, like China is becoming. This risks the peaceful development of Tibet.

As China goes from being a weak country to being a strong one, she will gain friends who expect decent behavior (Britain, Germany, Australia, Japan, etc) and create enemies angered by her support for their enemies — the Burmese, the Vietnamese, the South Vietnamese exiles, the Darfuris, and others. If China’s solution to uprisings is to escalate the problem, Beijing will gain more enemies than friends. If the Communist Party learns to de-escalate problems, Beijing will gain more friends than enemies. How can Tibet development if it is part of a country that the world distrusts?

Olympic Tank

The Communist Party’s escalatory policy to social problems is echoed in the behavior of the fingqings (愤青), those angry young men who embarrass China and threaten violence to any who support for Tibetans. Lady of tdaxp alerted me to a post, for instance, where one Chinese student in America was hurled with insults calling for her death a thousand times, calling for an investigation of her parents, and reporting that one informed the National Security Bureau, the Chinese embassy, and the local government of her statements. This swarming of dissidents would not happen if China did not want it to happen. Chinese who stand up for good behavior by the government — Chinese who are most in turn with the behavior that China needs to have — are called race-traitors (汉奸, literally “Han-Traitor,” often used for “China-traitor” because Han are virtually synonymous with Chinese).. It does not help China to oppress Chinese living in America. As the world learns about China’s oppression of Tibetans inside China — and how China does nothing to deter fingqing oppression of Tibetan activists abroad — China’s case in Tibet will be harmed.

A Chinese Patriot

Tibet should remain a part of China so that China can develop Tibet. For China to sustain this policy and retain its place in the world as a respected country, China needs to de-escalate the situation with the Tibetan people. The best way to do this is to invite the Dalai Lama (and his successors) back to Tibet as the Head of State of Tibet, whether in a continuation of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, the Central Tibetan Administration, a People’s Lamate of Tibet, or something else.

Tibet’s growth and development should be encouraged by all people who support those countries. The monks who call for the return are Tibetan patriots, and the Chinese students who support Tibet are Chinese patriots.

Support Tibet. Support China. Support the protests.

Support Chinese development of Tibet.

15 thoughts on “Tibet should remain a part of China”

  1. Also, china needs to stop its 4GW that is largely by Immigration warfare (displacing natives with Chinese immigriants).

    BTW, I can see your blog format again in Firefox.

  2. Glad the blog works again! :D

    The Han have been successful in colonizing every place that is both (a) political open to them and (b) biologically hospital to their success. Thus, Inner Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, Inner Turkestan, and Inner Tibet are now largely or majority Han. Outer Tibet and Vietnam, however, have successfully resisted Han colonization due to both political roadblocks and biological inhospitability.

  3. A very good introductory history is J.A.G. Roberts’ “A History of China” [1]. The story starts with pre-history, and concludes into the 21st century. History moves along at a good clip, but it’s a tremendous resource for putting things in context. The Qin, Han, Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties flow into each other, with the spring & autumn and warring states periods (plus this and that catastrophe) fitting sensibly into the narrative. The book didn’t tell me everything I needed to know, but provides a framework for fitting new information as I come across it.

    [1] http://www.amazon.com/History-China-Palgrave-Essential-Histories/dp/1403992754/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208206058&sr=1-4

  4. I agree with many of your points, but I cannot agree with your support of the protests. The Olympics protests breed ethnic hatred. They are the direct cause of the recent surge in Chinese nationalism (and support for the Communist Party). Why? Partly because they call for Tibetan independence, but more so because they are offensive and wrong. They burn the Chinese flag while making unsubstantiated claims of “cultural genocide” and the death of 1.2 million, claims which are NEVER questioned by the media. So Chinese people get the message that Westerners hate them.

    Such attacks inevitably turn into racism, on both Chinese and Western sides. In the end, who will suffer? The Tibetans.

    The Chinese government is doing its best now to extinguish the flames of ethnic hatred, but its only option now is to use the Dalai Lama as a scapegoat. What’s done is done.

    Hopefully Westerners will get bored and go back to sipping their lattes. Racism is never the answer.

  5. Tenzin,

    Social unrest in China is not going away. The bad effects you mention will not either. Fortunately, China’s currently at a place where she can afford to learn the lessons of how to deal with unrest in a sophisticated and wise manner.

    I’d rather have Sino-French popular animosity now, when it won’t actually effect anything valuable, than say in 15 years, when it might.

  6. What about Sino-Tibetan animosity?

    What about the millions Tibetans that have worked hard and succeeded under Chinese rule? And the millions of Tibetans that have no connection whatsoever to the Dalai Lama, his Yellow Hat sect, and the Tibetan diaspora? Should they have to suffer for the actions of the China-bashers in the West, none of whom have ever set foot in Tibet?

    Tibet is more than just Lhasa. There are many sects that were repressed under the Dalai Lamas. They are reappearing today because the gelugpa from Lhasa have lost their power.

    The Chinese government has tried to mitigate ethnic hatred by blaming the violence on a small number of ‘troublemakers’, the Dalai clique. Whether or not this is true, someone had to be blamed, and the government had two choices: blame Tibetans or blame the Dalai clique. Still, some Chinese don’t listen. They assume that all Tibetans sympathize with the Dalai Lama.

    I sincerely hope that the anti-China protests will die out soon along with rash, hotheaded Chinese anger.

  7. Tenzin,

    Thank you for the commnet.

    “What about Sino-Tibetan animosity?”

    Obviously, this is a serious issue. Outer Tibet remains the one area of the old Empire of the Great Qing that has been neither Hanized nor lost to a foreign power. The 1970s-eras tactics of the PLA do not help matters, and hopefulyl a recognition by the Communist party of the failure of those tactics in Tibet will come sooner, rather than later.

    “What about the millions Tibetans that have worked hard and succeeded under Chinese rule? And the millions of Tibetans that have no connection whatsoever to the Dalai Lama, his Yellow Hat sect, and the Tibetan diaspora? Should they have to suffer for the actions of the China-bashers in the West, none of whom have ever set foot in Tibet?”

    You’re on dangerous territory here.

    Are you arguing in favor of individual human rights for Tibetans?
    Are you arguing inf avor of collective human rights for Tibetans?
    Are you arguing for a poicy that increase the material standard of living for Tibetans?

    If you’re arguing the first or second, then the obvious villain is the Communist Party. If you’re arguing the third, then the correct way forward is to support the Dalai’s line of an autonomous Tibet developed by China.

    “Tibet is more than just Lhasa. There are many sects that were repressed under the Dalai Lamas. They are reappearing today because the gelugpa from Lhasa have lost their power.”

    The backwards-looking justifications used by many apologists for the Communist Party is embarrasing, and more befitting a third-world country than a great power.

    “The Chinese government has tried to mitigate ethnic hatred by blaming the violence on a small number of ‘troublemakers’, the Dalai clique… Still, some Chinese don’t listen. They assume that all Tibetans sympathize with the Dalai Lama.”

    You are arguing that the Dalai Lama does not enjoy widespread support inside Tibet?

    “Whether or not this is true, someone had to be blamed, and the government had two choices: blame Tibetans or blame the Dalai clique.”

    Why were actually addressing the problems and de-escalating the situation not in that last?

    “I sincerely hope that the anti-China protests will die out soon along with rash, hotheaded Chinese anger.”

    What protests are you speaking of?

    There were numerous protests in the West against the Communist Party’s violation of Chinese human rights (Han, Tibetan, Uigher, etc.). Are you saying that these were anti-China?

    There was the Lhasa uprising against the Communist Party… but if you call that “anti-China,” then do you recognize it as a struggle for national liberation?

  8. FT announces Free Tibet 2008 Television
    Posted August 11, 2008 at 5:43 PM

    Students for a Free Tibet has a new online video channel broadcasting from London throughout the worldwide uprising for Tibetan freedom during the Beijing Olympics: Free Tibet 2008 Television, or FT08.TV.

    With all the Olympic actions for Tibet taking place and particularly the incredible success of the ‘opening’ banner action outside Beijing’s ‘Bird’s Nest’ stadium on Aug. 6th and subsequent media storm here in the UK, it took some time to get FT08.TV ready for prime time.

    But with the dedicated help of lots of people, SFT’s new video channel is up and running, and filled with lots of must-see on-demand content, including inspiring Tibet activist video-profiles, action reports, video-blogs, and more.

    We’re also airing a nightly Windhorse Report live from London with SFT leaders Tenzin Dorjee and Han Shan – a roundup of reports from Beijing and around the world during the Olympics, with breaking news about protests, call-in interviews with news-making activists, episodes of SFT-TV (the efforts of SFT’s global grassroots), and info and analysis about the situation on the ground in Tibet.

    There will be more and more compelling content to watch every day and we’ll be improving the channel/website as we go (after all, this is but one small facet of our Olympic efforts right now). But please come check it out: surf around the many videos on the channel, or watch the stream (click on “Streaming Now” in the upper left-hand corner). Last but not least, you’re invited to submit video… check out the channel for more on what we’re looking for.

    Please help spread the word about FT08.TV– join the facebook group, blog about it, embed the videos, spam your address book – and of course, keep watching.

    And don’t forget to visit SFT’s Olympics Campaign website: http://www.FreeTibet2008.org and SFT’s blog: http://www.blog.studentsforafreetibet.org for more news and analysis from the frontlines of the current global effort to make Olympic history for Tibet.

    Note: many thanks to Nathan Dorjee, Shannon Service, Andi Mignolo, Alex Fountain, Thupten Nyima, Kala Mendoza, and many others for helping to make FT08.TV happen at this critical time.
    5:32 PM

    Go on your facebook, etc to announce freetibet2008.tv/live. After go on “social justice” websites like “witness.org” (check it out) to announce ft08.tv. Also check out blogs discussing Tibet issue’s and post the official ft08 announcement.

    Check out recent news articles on Tibet. Usually they have “comment” sections, post the ft08 annoucement.

  9. Tibetans have the right to choose whether or not they want to remain as part of china, they have that right to choose.
    Those who says the rule of the Dalai Lama in Tibet was repressive, please show the world evidence that does NOT come from beijing?
    Those who criticise the Tibetans of “inciting racial hatred”, sorry, will you just stand idly by and let your home be invaded by others? Don’t say “Tibet is a part of china”, if you live in china then your home is part of china as well, but would you allow just anyone to come into your home, take whatever is there, beat you up, even throwing you out of your home or stop you from getting out?

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