Obama Cries Racism

The video is at ABC News. The words:

“Nobody thinks that Bush or McCain have a real answer for the challenges we face. So what they are going to try to do is make you scared of me,” Obama warned, “You know he’s not patriotic enough. He’s got a funny name. You know, he doesn’t look like all of those other presidents on the dollar bills.”

Like a child who has learned to make a scene, Obama has long since learned that people will go easy on him if he complains about racism while speaking standard American English. Having likely received every position he ever held because of his race, a world without affirmative action is a world inconceivable to Barack Obama. Whenever things do not go well for him, Obama has learned to complain of racism.

What a cry baby.

Hat-tip to the Weekly Standard.

9 thoughts on “Obama Cries Racism”

  1. Its not that Obama has learned that. The hard left has been using that technique for at least 20 years that I have I personal knowledge of. That is the world Obama comes from, The rest is cover. I know you think differently, but this is what I have concluded.

  2. ‘Having likely received every position he ever held because of his race…’

    Do you have evidence of this? I have no evidence one way or another, but it seems that by now somebody would have uncovered it and made it public.

  3. Do you have evidence of this? I have no evidence one way or another, but it seems that by now somebody would have uncovered it and made it public.

    I cannot recall a position he has held that would have been available to him had his race been less politically correct. His role as a community organizer and then representative from south Chicago are obvious. The New York Times has this [1] from his unusual position at University of Chicago:

    The school had almost no black faculty members, a special embarrassment given its location on the South Side. Its sleek halls bordered a neighborhood crumbling with poverty and neglect. In his 2000 Congressional primary race, Representative Bobby L. Rush, a former Black Panther running for re-election, used Mr. Obama’s ties to the school to label him an egghead and an elitist.

    At the school, Mr. Obama taught three courses, ascending to senior lecturer, a title otherwise carried only by a few federal judges. His most traditional course was in the due process and equal protection areas of constitutional law. His voting rights class traced the evolution of election law, from the disenfranchisement of blacks to contemporary debates over districting and campaign finance. Mr. Obama was so interested in the subject that he helped Richard Pildes, a professor at New York University, develop a leading casebook in the field.

    [1] http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/30/us/politics/30law.html

  4. “I cannot recall a position he has held that would have been available to him had his race been less politically correct.”

    Can you explain to me how this comment isn’t, in return, playing the race card?

  5. Oh, that’s right, you are about dissecting issues and not getting candidates elected. You can just ignore my previous comment now.

  6. Certainly the Obama camp has tried to define criticism of Obama as race-baiting — even when one is criticizing Obama’s race-baiting [1], but I think Half-Sigma’s summary of the whole issue [2] is best:

    Nothing interesting here. Move on. Vote against Obama because he’s a dangerous liberal, and not because of anything he did or didn’t do while teaching law.

    [1] http://www.weeklystandard.com/weblogs/TWSFP/2008/08/axelrod_says_mccain_camp_is_ra.asp
    [2] http://www.halfsigma.com/2008/08/obama-the-law-professor.html

  7. Thanks for the reference. Maybe we are reading it differently. What I read is Obama was always interested in higher elective office and policy debates over the nuts-and-bolts of academic life, but was so good at what he did that he was rewarded for it. He was a good senior lecturer who didn’t want to be more than that because it would require efforts that would get in the way of his greater goals.

    I’ve served on several faculty hiring committees, and when you get to the top five or so candidates it’s always a judgment call. To have a general goal of increasing diversity can be part of that judgment. There are a limited number of candidates who are non-white and/or women. Some of them aren’t good enough to make it to the final list. Some are.

    Perhaps his race helped to get him noticed, but I see no indication that he wasn’t at least as qualified as any of the others in the top one percent. What I find disappointing is that our nation’s experience with affirmative action can lead us to assume that _because_ he is black he couldn’t have been as qualified or better than other candidates. The law of unintended consequences strikes again.

    (I remember being confronted by a campus women’s group where I was put under pressure to vote for a female candidate, because she was a woman. I was put in the interesting position of refusing to be pressured, denying that her gender should have much weight in the decision, and then voting for her anyway. I was already convinced she was the best candidate.)

  8. Dan McIntosh,

    Thanks for the excellent comment.

    but was so good at what he did that he was rewarded for it

    Really.

    Most Harvard Law Review editors do not have any publications?

    Most senior lecturers have not had full-time employment?

    I’ve served on several faculty hiring committees, and when you get to the top five or so candidates it’s always a judgment call. To have a general goal of increasing diversity can be part of that judgment.

    Agreed. So can minimizing the number of Jews. Their both racialist goals that distract from other ‘tie-breakers’ that might increase the merit of the staff, but presuming you benefit from this (that is, not an ethnicity left off the inclusion list), it can be helpful.

    Perhaps his race helped to get him noticed, but I see no indication that he wasn’t at least as qualified as any of the others in the top one percent.

    It definitely would be useful if University of Chicago would open their records of the process, so we could see if this is true.

    What I find disappointing is that our nation’s experience with affirmative action can lead us to assume that _because_ he is black he couldn’t have been as qualified or better than other candidates. The law of unintended consequences strikes again.

    This is entirely predictable. Other de facto affirmative action programs through time (England’s ancient focus on born class instead of merit, etc.) have had the same consequence.

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