Reaction to Russia’s invasion of Georia

Obama and McCain con-sponsor a resolution calling for Georgia to join NATO.

Serious talk of expelling Russia from the G-8. Let’s hope so. An organization of economically productive powers, China and India belong in an expanded G-8.. not parasitical states like Russia.

Unfortunately, Bush and Obama are signaling weakness. Fortunately, some countries (may) be doing more than just talk. Courtesy of zenpunditare the Israelis killing Russians?

6 thoughts on “Reaction to Russia’s invasion of Georia”

  1. The resolution to bring Georgia into NATO portends the emergence of, however briefly, an energized bipartisian foreign policy the likes of which we have not seen since the dawning of the Cold War.

    I think it will be very brief.

    But we should strike while the iron is hot. I hope some senator, perhaps one of the two presidential canidates, will have the vision to introduce a bill that funds a massive rebuilding effort for the areas of Georgia destroyed by Russia. Hell, we should offer it to the breakaway regions as well, just like we offered Marshall Plan aid to Soviet Union and its satelites.

    The Russian Leviathan has won the battel, but a well funded Sys Admin can still win this war.

  2. Putin, the chess master that he is, has made complete fools of Bush and his Republican cronies running this government. This “Great Game” as the British found out in the previous century is not to be treated lightly. Already, NATO is overextended in Afghanistan, and we are bogged down for “100 years” in Iraq. There is nothing we can do to protect what little democracy there is left in that region. As it stands with our supply routes cut off to Afghanistan ( the only land route is through the Khyber Pass, which the Taliban controls ), the most prudent action would be to admit the strategic failures we have made, withdraw from Afghanistan and let the Russians deal with the resurgent Taliban. As we then withdraw from a crumbling Iraq it will break into 3 waring regions, pretty much leaving the Mideast and Caucuses in chaos for the next century. We will long for the more simpler days of Israeli and Palestinian conflict. Can we “surge” one more time? With our depleted Treasury and only the State Militias to carry the load? Not with out a draft and great sacrifice by the American people. Are we willing to “mobilize” as in the past Great Wars?
    Hardly…

  3. Actually a major supply route into Afghanistan via land is through southwest Pakistan into southern Afghanistan. The tribes make sure these conveys are unmolested.

  4. To satisfy a curiosity itch, I looked up the Khyber pass on Wikipedia and found this map.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Mountain_passes_of_Afghanistan.png

    IF I’m reading it right (I’m no expert on topographical maps), the Durand line isn’t the most defensible barrier between Pakistan and Afghanistan–that would be drawn farther back, past Waziristan. That would suggest that Pakistan could be rid of most of its Taliban-AlQaeda problems just by withdrawing its presence to behind that line and letting us (allies + Afghan gov) take de facto control over the area.

    Question is: Even if they allowed that, would the extra access make up for the greater territory our forces would have to cover?

  5. Brent,

    I think it will be very brief.

    This is exactly right.

    What concerns us is less the best way foward, so much as the best way forward we can manage until Georgia falls into the normal foreign policy bickering. The new tripwire of US troops in Georgia [1], missles in Poland [2], and even NATO membership [3] are all sensible parts of a “hot iron” policy.

    Michael,

    Do you have anything more to offer than empty assertions and nonsensical questions?

    Catholicgauze,

    Excellent contributions!

    Michael,

    IF I’m reading it right (I’m no expert on topographical maps), the Durand line isn’t the most defensible barrier between Pakistan and Afghanistan–that would be drawn farther back, past Waziristan. That would suggest that Pakistan could be rid of most of its Taliban-AlQaeda problems just by withdrawing its presence to behind that line and letting us (allies + Afghan gov) take de facto control over the area.

    Agreed. Hopefully a fall of Musharraf [4] will allow us to operate more freely in Pakistan, without having to worry about an unstable ally.

    Question is: Even if they allowed that, would the extra access make up for the greater territory our forces would have to cover?

    Yes. Compared to fighting an insurgency in a large territory like southern Afghanistan and a base in Pakistan, fighting a larger insurgency without a base is qualitatively easier.

    [1] http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2008/08/13/us-forces-to-georgia.html
    [2] http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D92I7QP82&show_article=1
    [3] http://www.tdaxp.com/archive/2008/08/12/reaction-to-russias-invasion-of-georia.html
    [4] http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/15/world/asia/15pstan.html?em

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