India, unrelated to Pakistan

Michael sent me a fascinating article about the continuing Muslim insurgency against India, and India’s strategy of just-ignoring-it. It’s a fascinating approach, and similar (so I’ve heard) to India’s strategy against the Maoists in the east: ignore them. As I understand it, India is making a concerted effort to be and to act in relation to its regional neighbor China, instead of its physical neighbors Pakistan and Nepal. To use the word association game, India wants you to think of “India-China,” not “India-Pakistan” or “India-Nepal”:

Unfazed by bombings, India has an option: peace – washingtonpost.com
NEW DELHI — With a deadly attack on its embassy in Afghanistan, Pakistani troops clashing with its soldiers in disputed Kashmir and Islamic militants bombing its cities, India has in recent months seemed a country under siege.

Just don’t ask it to live like one.

Its ancient markets are as packed as ever. Its bright new malls bustle as never before. And few talk of avenging attacks that just a few years ago would likely have brought South Asia’s nuclear-armed rivals to the brink of war.

This must be coming as some political cost. India is losing as many lives as another Muslim-inspired insurgency: Iraq. (Though obviously in both Islam is an enabling, if not a driving, force.)

Still, the attacks have done little to alter life for most Indians, as terror-related deaths only account for a fraction of India’s 1.1 billion people. The U.S. National Counterterrorism Center reported 3,674 deaths from January 2004 to March 2007, second only to Iraq.

The partition of British South Asia, by removing a great number of Muslims from the Union of India, may be paying off. While we cannot roll-back history, it’s easy to see how disastrous life would be in India if it had 170 million more Muslims! In this way, the partition of British India reminds one of the end of the Cold War, where the European nations best suited to globalization (Poland, Czechoslovakia, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia, etc.) leaving the dead-weight of Russia behind.

Of course, this progress may be reversed. In Europe, weakness to Russia may encourage Russian diplomatic, financial, and economic control over Europe, retarding economic growth and helping pull west Eurasia off-line. In South Asia, Pakistan is relatively weaker, but >certain psychopathic proposals such as encouraging mass (non-token) people movement from Pakistan to India would only make the situation worse.

One of the breakthroughs of work on the Core and the Gap is that there is techniques that work perfectly well with the Core do not work in the Gap, and a focus on “justice” (which is part of the normal judicial process in the Core) only drags the Gap deeper into a self-referential spiral of despair.

The future, not the past, is the watch-word of the Core. When the Gap speaks, we close our ears, as we must. When the Gap attacks, we ignore when we can, we destroy what we must, and firewall the rest. When we integrate the Gap, it is on the basis of profit, not justice.

9 thoughts on “India, unrelated to Pakistan”

  1. The condition of Muslims in India is a combination of that not so benign neglect in recent years (which emboldens extremists and fundamentalists to act as power brokers, much like Britain’s neglect of Muslim communities in the late 80’s helped create the problems of Londonistan) as well as economically isolated communities and a dreadful education system.

    India’s fascist Hindu nationalists are a part of the problem but India’s new “untouchables” do not have to be in this condition for the long term. A combination of private sector schools established by wealthy Muslims in India along with the work of NGO’s like the one established by the Turkish government in Pakistan which teaches essentially Western subjects could help save a good deal of the youngest generation of Muslims from the fate of their forefathers in India.

    In the long term, as you’ve stated before, the GWOT is more about Pakistan than anywhere else, and the eventual dissolution of the Pakistani nation into several smaller countries and autonomous regions would probably help the plight of Muslims in S. Asia in general.

    Granted, the Indian gov’t also miserably fails far too many of its Hindu youth with a broken education system. Private schools are probably the best option there as well.

    You are spot-on in India being wise to ignore as much of it as they can. The scale of internal challenges alone are enough to warrant such a policy.

  2. Silly me. I neglected to point out that one drawback of this “ignore the terrorists” is that by ignoring the social problems created by India’s long tradition of allowing these fundamentalist Muslim laws to trump the Indian constitution and basic human rights, India only further abandons its Muslim population to the fundamentalists and terrorists.

  3. 170 million people is really a drop in the bucket for the indian population of over a billion!

    Pakistan and China are the real problems hurting India. Pakistan continues to sponser radicals and extremists to harrass India’s borders while China is diverting rivers and resources in the Himalayan mountains away from India and back into China (on Indian soil). Despite all these things India’s economy continues to flower, so kudos to India.

    Also I think it would be good to mention that India has the largest muslim population of any country in the world, the bulk of those muslims not being radical.

  4. Eddie,

    Well said.

    India is a very poor country, much poorer than China.

    Still, it’s per capita equality with Pakistan is a measure of its stunning growth, and the general atrophy of Islamic civilization.

    Like China 20 years ago, India needs to concentrate on getting rich. Other issues should be delayed until the country has achieved some small comfort.

    ATB,

    Indian-Chinese trade is measured in the billions, and is growing rapidly. Resource competition primarily impacting economically-offline peasants certainly can be an emotional issue, but it is not near the same scale as Indian-Chinese economic cooperation.

    You make a good point on India’s generally peaceful (and in absolute number, very large) Muslim minority. Perhaps India is the one country in the world where a sizable Muslim minority was not socialized by a Muslim elite? I don’t know.

  5. Dan,
    Agreed. India will try to do this but its very status as a largely successful democracy will temper its rush to get rich, because the left behinds and marginalized groups retain enormous voting power and can apply brakes to legislative agendas and painful reforms.
    Its caste strictures (much like Pakistan’s, which are merely disguised in feudal landowner and tribal relationships) also will restrain its get rich drive.
    More good news than bad news for India though with a mountain of bad news for Pakistan.

  6. Very true tdaxp, perhaps it is relevant to the region. India is no holy land for muslims, and with the necessity of having lots of children in India to run the farm, (or other business, don’t hold me to it LOL). These two factors seem to be sponsoring the 20% muslim population in India.

    Perhaps religion is the real culprit of middle east instability.

    no holy land no problems? interesting concept to think over

  7. Eddie,

    Pakistan has a class-structure, rather than a class-structure. It’s an important distinction, but as you imply, if you’re very poor, you’re life is going to be bad regardless.

    More good news than bad news for India though with a mountain of bad news for Pakistan.

    Excellent summary.

    Very true tdaxp, perhaps it is relevant to the region. India is no holy land for muslims, and with the necessity of having lots of children in India to run the farm, (or other business, don’t hold me to it LOL). These two factors seem to be sponsoring the 20% muslim population in India.

    Perhaps religion is the real culprit of middle east instability.

    no holy land no problems? interesting concept to think over

    Islam’s borders are bloody, regardless of whether the Prophet lived there, ruled there, dreamed of being there, etc.

    India, like America, appears to be effective at assimilating Muslims. It’s quite the accomplishment, if a mysterious one.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *