Two self-efficacy stories

1. Kids who are paid to study study more

Pretty obvious. Wise educators should align extrinsic and intrinsic rewards, at least when dealing with children who are not able to make the decision to learn by themselves.

Specifically, educators of children should pay them to study, while demonstrating to the students that their efforts will pay off (literally!)

2. Most blogs are abandoned

Creative bloggers need to not only master their craft and gain the attention of their peers: first, they need to keep trying, in spite of many failed attempts at meaningful attention.

Both of these stories are courtesy of Slashdot: News for Nerds.

6 thoughts on “Two self-efficacy stories”

  1. So high self-efficacy for renumerated blogging, perhaps lower self-efficacy for unrenumerated blogging. Makes sense 🙂

    Unless blogging is an addiction…

  2. “1. Kids who are paid to study study more”

    Imagine, if this had been around when I was a young’un, today I’d be rich AND smart.

    “2. Most blogs are abandoned”

    (heh) Tell me about it!!

    (Then again, if #1 had been true for me, a **possible** side-benefit would be that #2 wouldn’t apply to me….)

  3. Edgewise,

    Imagine, if this had been around when I was a young’un, today I’d be rich AND smart.

    That’s the idea! (At least by the standards of a teen!)

  4. Edgewise,

    If I had a nickle for every time someone quoted ‘Punished by Rewards’…

    Basically, that whole line of argument relies on either an ignorance or hostility of Variable Ratio Reinforcement [1], which is the most useful tool of the modern science of behavior change.

    The other criticisms are nonsense. It is ‘exploitive’ to tailor a treatment to a population? What kind of nonsense is that?

    [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reinforcement#Simple_schedules

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *