Tag Archives: blogging

Self Efficacy, and the way forward

While I’ll always be a fan of the OODA loop, a great conceptual model of human cognition, it does not help me in predicting outcomes. That’s why I generalized Horn et al to create a domain-knowledge/general-ability/motivation/behavior model of performance. Writing about this will be its own challenge, however.

This comes at about the same time I have discovered self-efficacy, an incredibly powerful tool first developed by Albert Bandura. Self-efficacy blows away concepts such as self-esteem, self-concept, self-definition, identity, and so on, and also better explains findings described by Expectancy-Value Theory, Goal Theory, and so on.

Self-efficacy boils down to a set of simple questions, all of which have this form: How confident are you that you can perform a specific action in order to achieve a goal, as of now. Self-efficacy is obviously beyond behavioralism, because such self-reports were frowned on by the behavioralists that Skinner. However, it is much more action-centered than other ‘cognitive’ or ‘constructive’ theories. What you feel, how proud you are, what you really want, so on, and burned away. How confident are you, right now, that you can do A to get B?

For instance, from this online resource on self-efficacy, comes a standard practice question, drived from Bandura’s famous “Guide to Creating Self-Efficacy Scales” (PDF).

If you were asked to lift a 10 pound object right now, how certain are you that you can lift it?

Respondants are given 11 choices, from 0 to 100, with 0 meaning cannot lift at all, and 100 meaning can lift without any problem.

When I first encountered self-efficacy I thought it was just a proxy of domain knowledge or long-term memory, but many, many studies show it is a seperate construct that explains variation on its own. A popularization of the concept is available from the Wall Street Jounal.

So now, I am planning to use self-efficacy, along with the rest of my model, to look at creativity in blogging. This is a large task and I need an organizational structure. Fortunately, Siwatu (2005) provides an excellent model. While Siwatu examined a different concept, we share a methodological outlook as well as a focus on self-efficacy.

So, using Siwatu as a model, how I plan to attack the problem. Italicized headings are areas where I replaced Siwatu’s topics with analogous ones in my own research.

Chapter 1 Introduction 1
Purpose of the Study 4
Research Questions 7
Definition of Terms 7
Blogging 7
Blogging Self-Efficacy 8
Blogging Creativity 8

Chapter II Review of the Literature 9
Creativity
Creation 11
The Novel 12
The Useful 14
The Field 16
The Domain 17
The Value of Creativity 17

Self-Efficacy
What are self-efficacy beliefs? 19
Source of Information 20
Mastery Experience 20
Vicarious Experience 20
Verbal Persuasion 21
Physiological and emotional states 21
Assessment of Self-Efficacy 22
The development of the CES Scale 25
Concerns regarding CES 29
What are Job and Creativity Self Efficacy? 33
Cognitive, Motivational, and Strategies Variables 35

General Ability 35
Domain Knowledge 37
Motivation 38
Strategies 41

Summary and Predictions 42
Chapter 3 Methods 46
Introduction 36
Quantitative Phase 36
Population and Sample 47
Measures 47
Creative Blogging Self-Efficacy Scale 47
Job Blogging Self-Efficacy Scale 48
Blogging Domain Knowledge Scale 49
Attitude Scale 50
General Ability Scale 51

Data Analysis 52

This model is missing a replacement for Siwatu’s qualitative section. I imagine that will come from creating and revising the scales I need in this research.

Please take a survey… for science!

Title: Public Request for Participation

This is a public request for participation for an academic project, “Creativity and Blogging .”

This project attempts to discover what is the relationship between blogging success and attitude. If you choose to participate, you will take a survey aimed at discovering what you think about blogging, what you feel about blogging, and what you do about blogging. You would also be asked a few questions regarding your personality and your views on cooperation. This involves answering about seventy questions. The survey should take about 30 minutes.

You will receive no direct benefit from participating. The only indirect benefit you would receive is the knowledge you are assisting in ongoing scientific research. No compensation is provided Before you begin the survey, you will be shown an informed consent form with additional details. Of course, you can stop taking the survey at any time.

If you agree to participate, please follow the below link to take the web survey:

Take a survey on Creativity and Blogging

Thank you,

The Creativity and Blogging Team

Blogspirit: User Hostile Design

As I commented to Curtis, blogspirit is acting up again. (I am completely unsurprised.) Blogspirit’s service recently has been terrible. I would not recommend anyone use it. Only the fact that 60-80 hour weeks are pretty typical for me right now prevents me from transitioning over to a better service.

At the time I started this blog I had just finished with my Computer Science master’s thesis. I did not want to do any more programming for a while, and blogspirit offered three big advantages that blogspot didn’t. (At the time I didn’t know how much I would enjoy blogging, so I looked only at free services)

1. functioning trackbacks
2. categories
3. an easily modifiable design

However, blogspirit currently has a gigantic problem: it eats comments. Sometimes they don’t go through at all. At other times I have to wait days for them to be posted. Worse, blogspirit tech support has told me they only notify bloggers after one of these partial systems outages is complete, meaning I have no way of knowing the status of these problems while it happens.

I am sickened and disgusted by blogspirit’s anti-user, anti-community problems. I am disappointed and saddened by the way tech support has gone from being helpful to being adversarial in its approach. I am sorry that replies I have penned over at Open Thread and Classrooms Evolved, Part III: Deliberative Learning are in limbo for who-knows-how-long. I am sorry to all the people whose time and energy blogspirit wastes.

Is there anything good to say about blogspirit? Yes. They are not crooks. They are not unethical.

Just incompetent.

Blogspirit’s Incompetent and Inhuman System Administration

Back in the day, I was very happy with blogspirit. They took care of the heavy lifting required for blogging, letting me focus on writing and building a community. However, over recent months blogspirit’s service has become less and less reliable. Below is a review of blogspirit’s comment feature written by Curtis of Phatic Communion:

Note: this is a comment left at TDAXP — rather, an attempted comment, since once again I am apparently barred from leaving this comment on Blogspirit. This time, an old Blogspirit Phenotype is being expressed: I hit SEND to post the comment, and I’m instantly redirected to the front page of TDAXP, without the comment being posted. This has happened more than once with this comment, so I’ve given up.

I’m tempted to create a new category for Phatic Communion, TDAXP Comments, and utilize the trackback feature for connecting these to individual posts on that blog, since I’m apparently able to leave trackbacks to TDAXP. Such a method would be queer indeed, because I’d be establishing a new kind of social interaction, I think — unless some other blogger already dedicates a portion of his own blog to posting comments intended for another specific blog. The format might need tweaking. The problem for me is that ‘commenting’ is a slightly different intellectual format than posting ripostes or highlights as a new post.

More specifically: Dan’s Blogspirit setup does not allow HTML formatting — which has always been an irritation for me — and this limits speech. Odd little notations must be created when commenting at TDAXP, e.g. using asterisks to express emphasis and posting full links as footnotes or interjections rather than linking text. So the following comment to “Growing Pack Behavior in Juvenile Homo Sapiens” will be revised here on Phatic Communion to HTML-formatting and thus in that particular only will not match the comment I intended to leave but may therefore be more legible.

I agree with everything that Curtis is saying.

This is sickening. Blogspirit suffers prologued, partial, outages of service and doesn’t bother to inform bloggers that this will happen, is happening, or has happened. Horrid service like this is why I admire Dreamhost, the service that hosts Jim River Report. They have technical snafus too — everyone does. But unlike blogspirit, Dreamhost has the basic human dignity to let its customers know what is going on.

Blogspirit Now Worse Than Ever

I’ve had my problems with ‘s so-so service before. They suffered DDOS attacks without notifying bloggers in a timely manner. Gravatars never worked. Comments and templates have been broken. The support blog is a joke, as is the pay-based help center.

I wrote a ticket because of massive trackback spam that blogspirit lets through, even when I turn off trackbacks on old posts, and the next day I find that the problem is now worse then ever.

  • The support ticket I had is now gone. Not just “closed.” But gone, with no record.
  • I am no longer getting notification of new comments.
  • All of my posts are signed by “Aaron,” even though I am writing them under my login name
  • I’m still getting trackbrack spam
  • Real trackbacks, like from Coming Anarchy, don’t get through.

For the mean-time I’ve turned off guest authoring, delete the spam trackbacks manually, and boil in my own anger.

Oh well. At least I’m now down for days, or hacked. But I have lost comments.