Tag Archives: bobby jindal

Bobby Jindal Signs Chemical Castration Bill

Amazingly good news. And timely too, if you consider my recent posts “Clearing the Ghetto” and “Better Behavior through Chemistry.” Bobby Jindal has signed a bill allowing for the chemical castration of certain criminals. While the bill itself is aimed at reducing sexually-driven crimes with high recidivism, an obvious implication of the bill is improved genetic health of the population. Preventing criminals from breeding is an important part of preventing crime, because criminal behavior is heritable.

Jindal Signs Chemical Castration Bill » Outside The Beltway | OTB
Lousiana Governor Bobby Jindal yesterday signed the “Sex Offender Chemical Castration Bill” hours after the Supreme Court overturned that state’s law allowing capital punishment for child rapists. It “provides that on a first conviction of aggravated rape, forcible rape, second degree sexual battery, aggravated incest, molestation of a juvenile when the victim is under the age of 13, or an aggravated crime against nature, the court may sentence the offender to undergo chemical castration. On a second conviction of the above listed crimes, the court is required to sentence the offender to undergo chemical castration.”

Ben Domenech thinks Jindal is sending a suggestive message to the Supreme Court. But, of course, the law had passed through the legislative process before the Court’s 5-4 ruling, so it’s merely a politically happy coincidence.

America deserves to be remain a great nation, and part of this of course is increasing our population. But increasing the quality of our population, improving our human capital, is important too. Weeding out criminals and sexuals predators is part of that process.

While we should always focus on eugenics and healing people, preventing harm and fighting dysgenics is important, too. Men can breed well into very old age, long after they are released from prison. Chemical castration can stop that.

Bobby Jindal for Veep

Interesting (albeit biased) list of “cons” for Piyush “Bobby” Jindal:

Townhall.com::The GOP Veep List: Pros and Cons::By Michael Medved
CON: He’s too young, too inexperienced – how can Republicans criticize Obama as unprepared, when Jindal is ten years younger? Actually, this argument ends up turning in Jindal’s favor, since he possesses vastly MORE experience than Obama, particularly in executive positions. In addition to his early triumphs as governor, he’s also won spectacular success in a long series leadership roles – as executive director of the National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare, Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, President of the Louisiana State University System (at the ludicrously young age of 26!), Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services (unanimously confirmed – and praised – in a bipartisan vote of the US Senate), and two terms in the House of Representatives (including service on the House Committee on Homeland Security and re-election with 88% of the vote). Nothing in the Obama resume comes close to any of this. It’s true that I started promoting Jindal for Veep on my radio show nearly a year ago (before he even won election as governor) and, frankly, I don’t see serious negatives to his candidacy.

The article goes onto discuss John Thune, who I saw being groomed three years ago as a running mate for John McCain.

But there’s no imaginable way that someone elected to the Senate in 2004 is ready for national office, right?

Democrats v. Catholics

Markos Moulitsas Zuniga writes “The gloves are coming off in Lousiani” in response to this weird, anti-Catholic advertisement put out by the Lousiani State Democratic Party

Not stopping there, he posted a bizarre pueudo-summary of an article previously written by Jindal for the New Oxford Review.

Much of the nonsense about the relationship between Church and State comes from the late 19th century, when anti-immigrant nativists targeted Catholics (Irish, Italians, Poles, etc.) as un-American and un-Christian. It’s no surprising that Louisiana’s Democratic Party, facing a second-generation American and first-generation Catholic, decided to play the faith card again.