Tag Archives: fallujah

Fallujah Marine Cleared (Again)

No Court-Martial for Marine,” Associated Press, 5 May 2005, http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,155540,00.html.

The Army will not Court Martial a marine who shot an insurgent who was playing oppossum. Good, because feigning injury is a war crime, and the marine put a stop to that.

A Marine corporal who was videotaped shooting an apparently injured and unarmed Iraqi in a Fallujah mosque last year will not face court-martial, the Marine Corps announced Wednesday.

A review of the evidence showed the Marine’s actions in the shooting were “consistent with the established rules of engagement and the law of armed conflict,” Maj. Gen. Richard F. Natonski (search), commanding general of the 1st Marine Division (search), said in a statement.

The corporal was not identified in the two-page statement issued by Camp Pendleton, where the division is headquartered, north of San Diego.

Based on all the evidence in the case, and the rules of engagement that were in effect at the time, it is clear the corporal could have reasonably believed that the AIF [anti-Iraq forces] shown in the videotape posed a hostile threat justifying his use of deadly force,” the statement said.

Good, because this same decision was made in February.

Why bring it up again?

Fallujah Marine Cleared

Not enough evidence to charge marine in point-blank Fallujah shooting: report,” AFP, http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/focusoniraq/2005/February/focusoniraq_February173.xml&section=focusoniraq, 24 February 2005 (from Roth Report).

Great news. The Marine who helped retake Fallujah and, horror of horrors, killed an enemy who played possum, won’t be charged.

A US marine, captured on film killing a wounded Iraqi at point blank range during November’s assault on Fallujah, will not be formally charged due to lack of evidence, according to a report Wednesday on CBS News.

A Marine spokesman, Captain Dan McSweeney, told AFP, however, he had been informed by the Navy Criminal Investigative Services, which is investigating the killing, that “the case is still very much open.”

The November 13 shooting occurred during a search of a mosque in a widely broadcast incident that sparked worldwide outrage and was described by the International Committee of the Red Cross as a demonstration of “utter contempt for humanity.”

In the incident, a trooper raised his rifle and shot point blank at an apparently unarmed, wounded Iraqi who was slumped against one of the mosque walls, in footage captured by an embedded camaraman working for the NBC network.

Although the insurgents were found to be unarmed, investigators said the one the Marine believed he had seen moving could have been reaching for a weapon.

The rifleman was withdrawn from combat pending the results of the investigation, but the graphic footage enraged many, months after the scandal over US troops’ abuse of inmates at the Abu Ghraib prison.

CBS News said Wednesday it had learned that military investigators had concluded insufficient evidence existed to formally charge the marine.

The raid on Fallujah, part of an attempt at reclaiming key lawless enclaves across the country ahead of January elections, has been the largest military operation in Iraq since the March 2003.

Of course, the news comes from CBS, so maybe it’s based on fake documents.

Sadr and Happier

Two Iraq cities await elections, Steven Komarow, USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2005-01-11-cover-usat_x.htm, 11 January 2005 (from Chrenkoff through Iraq the Model).

Austin Bay Writes…,” by Glenn Reynolds, Instapundit, http://instapundit.com/archives/020575.php, 19 January 2005.

As Iraq journeys to becoming a normal county, the Shia have realized: democracy means the end of Sunni tyrant. The Sunni have realized: democracy means the end of Sunni tyrannt.

Sadr City and Fallujah illustrate both the hopes and risks of Iraq’s march toward democracy. One place embraces the politicking; the other ignores it. One sees how a new government could benefit it; the other fears elections will lead to oppression or worse. As the vote approaches, one sees itself as a potential winner. The other’s already lost.

Ironically, through much of the U.S. occupation of the past 21 months, Fallujah and Sadr City have followed parallel paths. Although Fallujah is a Sunni Muslim enclave, a stronghold of deposed dictator Saddam Hussein, and Sadr City is dominated by the rival Shiite sect, both exploded into rebellion against the occupation.

Last April, there was open warfare in both places. Skirmishes raged into the early fall in both. U.S. military convoys regularly were ambushed and troops were killed in both. But then Sadr City’s and Fallujah’s paths diverged. The Shiites have begun embracing elections; many Sunnis fear them.

Now a U.S. officer, Brig. Gen. Jeffery Hammond of the 1st Cavalry Division, says Sadr City is the safest place in or around Baghdad. About 18,000 people have reconstruction jobs, he says, earning about $6 a day. “Sadr City is what the future of Iraq can look like,” he says.

Those who were once taking up arms are now talking democracy. “Before, the men were buying black cloth for their (martyrs’) banners. Now for the election, we are buying white cloths” for posters, says candidate Fatah al-Sheikh.

Now, who in American history do the Salafists-Islamists remind you of…

Craig Henry: “How are the ‘insurgents’ in Iraq different from the KKK in Mississippi circa 1963? And aren’t the nameless election workers who are dying everyday in Mosul and Baghdad heroes like Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner?”

Yes, and there were even people calling the Klansmen “patriots” and comparing them to the Minutemen.

Fallujah

Marines clear out Fallujah
Sharon Behn
The Washington Times
http://www.washtimes.com/world/20041213-123025-1824r.htm

FALLUJAH, Iraq — Marines yesterday cleared bodies from buildings at the scene of their biggest battle since the fall of Baghdad, securing this former insurgent stronghold for the return of thousands of civilians and upcoming elections.
But six weeks before the historic vote, a U.S. official said, fewer than 1 percent of eligible Iraqis have responded to a voter-registration drive, forcing authorities to look for other ways to build up voter lists.

A city of geniuses. First, support an insurgency against the world’s only superpower and 80% of your fellow countrymen. Then, kill American civilians. Then, fight an idiotic battle which ends, predictably, with thousands and thousands of casualties. After all, guerilla wars are meant for holding ground. Then, bitterly refuse the send delegates to represent you.

Great job, guys. Fallujah: City of Geniuses.

Hat tip Drudge Report.

The Open Air Prison

Returning Fallujans will face clampdown,” by Anne Barnard, Boston Globe, 5 December 2004, http://www.boston.com/news/world/articles/2004/12/05/returning_fallujans_will_face_clampdown/ (from Democratic Underground).

Life in Fallujah…

The US military is drawing up plans to keep insurgents from regaining control of this battle-scarred city, but returning residents may find that the measures make Fallujah look more like a police state than the democracy they have been promised.

Under the plans, troops would funnel Fallujans to so-called citizen processing centers on the outskirts of the city to compile a database of their identities through DNA testing and retina scans. Residents would receive badges displaying their home addresses that they must wear at all times. Buses would ferry them into the city, where cars, the deadliest tool of suicide bombers, would be banned.

This is the bloody end of apartheid. More and more, Sunni Arabs are realizing that they have lost. Their actions have alienated the Kurds and the Shia (even the Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani didn’t condemn the Fallujah assault), and their political fate is bleak. In South Africa, the Afrikaaners were able to join the ANC and loose influence quietly. Imagine them, but more hated.

In 1946 Romania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland expelled their German resisdents. In Iraq, we’re just creating perpetual prisons.