Tag Archives: tianjin

Wedding in Tianjin

Yesterday I had the pleasure of returning to Tianjin to attend a wedding.

The wedding was great, and included everything you wouldn’t expect, from a caravan of red cars to the Imperial March.


Red is a lucky color in China, so it was definitely a “red letter day.” The families had contracted with a service to drive us from Beijing to Tianjin (about a 90 minute jaunt) in a line of red cars.


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The drivers were a ton of fun — to kill time they cooperated to repeatedly cut-off a car which had cut us off


Turned out to be a cop!

And using the CB radios to communicate in…. unorthodox ways


Not his radio

The ceremony itself was quite nice, and one of the fellow guests mentioned that Chinese weddings are increasingly emphasized by their western counterpart. The exclusive use of American music (with Celine Dion at a particularly important part) was notable, though I’ve never heard the Star Wars Imperial March used as a wedding march before.


All hail Palpatine!

All hail Celine!

The wedding reception was held in the same building as the couple’s new apartment, which they proudly showed off. This was the highlight of the day: their freakin’ sweet HDTV.

A great day! We were driven back to Xizhimen on a chartered bus

And then took a taxi back. The weather was beautiful, and the sky was clear.

Thanks for the wonderful day!

SkyFord: City of Pollution

The final segment of my Tianjin Sentiments (perhaps a fitting companion to another blogger’s “Balkan Memories“?) is of the pollution in Tianjin. Tianjin is composed of two characters — Tian meaning Heavenly or Sky, Jin meaning Ford. In a previous post I explained that I would translate Tian as “Heavenly” for beautiful things, and as “Sky” for more prosaic uses. Thus, this post on the pollution in Tianjin discusses contamination in Sky Ford.

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The pollution in Skyford is everywhere. Our local guides explained that it was the result of the building boom that builds new offices, malls, and apartments everywhere. Certainly there was a lot of construction in Tianjin, as there was in Beijing.


Some of the power plants in Tianjin clearly gave off a blackish smoke


Moore cooling plants, these as scene from the train (metro)


At the Port of Tianjin I saw more trucks than I have ever seen, in my life.


Riding in a taxi in this is oddly relaxing: as you’ve already forfeited your life, there is nothing to do but wait.


A Chinese wears a mask (as I did) while gazing out at what was once the Pacific Ocean


To the smog-chocked horizon and beyond, industrial salt ponds grew on the reclaimed land. Plants did not.


Industrial machinery helps process the salt


Salt Town


The ocean was brown. The cause of that was, among other things…


… and oil refinery. The refinery is much, much closer than it looks. The deadly smog makes everything look hazy and far away, and this part of Tianjin had the worst smog of anywhere in China I’ve seen.


While the Ocean is dead, the port lives. The amount of shipping containers was Cyclopean, if not Lovecraftian


View of death from the former deathship, the Soviet ACC Kiev.


This was on the LSD-like riverfront of Skyford, near the strawberry house and waterfall. Ugly beyond description.

Tianjin, a tdaxp series.

Cruisin’ with the People’s Liberation Army Navy

The Soviet Aircraft Carrier Kiev, first of the Kiev Class and former mistress of the Black Sea Fleet, is now an amusement park in Tianjin.

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Let the cruise begin!


The Kiev in the not-so-far distance. The choking, lethal haze of Tianjin gives the illusion of distance to everything.


Part of the amusement-park/museum was a “war is bad” exhibit, which nevertheless contained examples of heroism, including…


… American exploits in the Second World War.


The Map room showed the continent of Africa and her lesser-known twin continent, Africa 2.


A portion of a world map, with Greenland mysteriously unlabeled.


The Kiev in more fearsome days


English translations were mostly good, some with errors…


… that were occasionally fixed.


The deck of the helicarrier.


“Happy Everyday” wishes the sign, as one gazes up the hellish ruins of what was once a coast.


Can you see Tianjin? Of course not. Even though you are in Tianjin.


The broken beech, closer-up.


“Happy Everyday” and a murdered ocean.


A fearsome ship threatens to spread…


… Nestle chocolate ice-cream and Coca-Cola throughout the world. Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!


A once formidable ship…


… gazes blindly into the absent sky.


I was too hard on Al Gore. Because of Global Warming, the Pacific Ocean now extents to Tiananmen Square. Sorry, Al.


Tianjin, a tdaxp series.

Tianjiin: A Pictorial Travelogue

This is a hard post to right — in the physical sense. The pollution in Tianjin is worse than Beijing, and the combination of the air and the days have caught up to me. All day I have this ugly feeling of exhaustion without sleepiness.

There’s a lot to see in Tianjin during this sidetrip, so I decided to break up my Tianjin photolog into a mini series. As this series completes descriptions & such will be added to the section titles below.

Statue in Tianjin

These entries are thematic, as opposed to the day-by-day accounts in the rest of my Beijing photos, They aren’t part of SummerBlog ’06, but are a summer (mini) series nonetheless.

Enjoy!