"Multiculturalists" in Lincoln Public Schools Ban Books

LPS mulls best Native books,” by Margaret Reist, Lincoln Journal Star, 3 October 2006, http://www.journalstar.com/articles/2006/10/03/top_story/doc4521bf0c8a4b7965832929.txt.

Recently, my blog friend Adam of The Metropolis Times highlighted Banned Book Weeks. Ironically, the day after Banned Books Weeks Ended, Lincoln Public Schools set to work banning some more

And in addition to seeking out the best Native literature it could find — 128 new recommended books — it took the unusual step of recommending school libraries remove 12 books from their shelves.

Here is a list of the books:

The best justifications are those that are explicitly racist, such as

Misrepresents Lakota spiritual beliefs and cultural practices. Relies too heavily on research by non-Natives.

for Sitting Bull and His World and

Misunderstanding of Navajos’ strong oral storytelling traditions (no child would take notes while an elder told a story). Pathetic attempts at Native humor. “Whitewashing” of Native experiences.

for The Girl Who Chased Away Sorrow: The Diary of Sarah Nita, a Navajo Girl, New Mexico, 1864

Books to avoid” about Thanksgiving from the same group that inspired this censorship list — Oyate — are available below the fold. A shorter version is also available.


Accorsi, William, Friendship’s First Thanksgiving. Holiday House, 1992, grades 1-2
Aliki, Corn is Maize: The Gift of the Indians. Harper & Row, 1976, grades 1-3
Anderson, Laurie Halse, Thank You, Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving. Simon & Schuster, 2002, grades 1-4
Ansary, Mir Tamim, Thanksgiving Day. Heinemann, 2002, grades 1-3
Apel, Melanie Ann, The Pilgrims. Kidhaven Press, 2003, grades 3-5

Bartlett, Robert Merrill, The Story of Thanksgiving. HarperCollins, 2001, grades 3-5
Barth, Edna, Turkeys, Pilgrims, and Indian Corn: The Story of the Thanksgiving Symbols. Clarion, 1975, grades 2-4
Borden, Louise, Thanksgiving Is… Scholastic, 1997, grades 1-2
Brown, Marc, Arthur’s Thanksgiving. Little, Brown, 1983, grades 1-2
Bruchac, Joseph, Squanto’s Journey: The Story of the First Thanksgiving. Harcourt, 2000, grades 2-4
Buckley, Susan Washburn, Famous Americans: 15 Easy-to-Read Biography Mini-Books. Scholastic, 2000, grades 1-2
Bulla, Clyde Robert, Squanto, Friend of the Pilgrims. Scholastic, 1990

Celsi,Teresa, Squanto and the First Thanksgiving. Steck-Vaughn, 1989, grades 1-2
Clements, Andrew, Look Who’s in the Thanksgiving Play! Simon & Schuster, 1999, preschool-2
Cohen, Barbara, Molly’s Pilgrim. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1983, grades 3-4
Conaway, Judith, Happy Thanksgiving! Things to Make and Do. Troll Communications, 1986, grades 1-3
Crane, Carol, and Helle Urban, P is for Pilgrim: A Thanksgiving Alphabet. Sleeping Bear Press, 2003, grades 1-4

Dalgliesh, Alice, The Thanksgiving Story. Scholastic, 1954, 1982, grades 3-4
Daugherty, James,The Landing of the Pilgrims. Random House, 1987, grades 4-6
Davis, Kenneth C., Don’t Know Much About the Pilgrims. HarperCollins, 2002, grades 2-4
DePaola, Tomie, My First Thanksgiving. Putnam, 1992, preschol
Donnelly, Judy, The Pilgrims and Me. Grossett & Dunlap, 2002
Dubowski, Cathy East, The Story of Squanto, First Friend to the Pilgrims. Dell, 1990, grades 3-4

Fink, Deborah, It’s a Family Thanksgiving! A Celebration of an American Tradition for Children and Their Families. Harmony Hearth, 2000
Flindt, Myron, Pilgrims: A simulation of the first year at Plymouth Colony. Interact, 1994, curriculum for grades 3-up
Fritz, Jean, Who’s That Stepping on Plymouth Rock? Putnam & Grossett, 1975, grades 3-5

George, Jean Craighead, The First Thanksgiving. Puffin, 1993
Gibbons, Gail, Holiday House, grades 1-2:
Thanksgiving Day. 1985
Thanksgiving Is… 2004
Greene, Rhonda Gowler, The Very First Thanksgiving Day. Atheneum, 2002

Hale, Anna W., The Mayflower People: Triumphs and Tragedies. Harbinger House, 1995
Hallinan, P.K., Today Is Thanksgiving! Ideals Children’s Books, 1993, grades 1-2
Harness, Cheryl, Three Young Pilgrims. Aladdin, 1995, grades 3-6
Hayward, Linda, The First Thanksgiving. Random House, 1990, grades 1-3
Hennessy, B.G., One Little, Two Little, Three Little Pilgrims. Viking, 1999, grades 1-2

Jackson, Garnet, The First Thanksgiving. Scholastic, 2000, grades 2-up
Jassem, Kate, Squanto: The Pilgrim Adventure. Troll Communications, 1979, grades 3-5

Kamma, Anne, If you were at…The First Thanksgiving. Scholastic, 2001
Kessel, Joyce K., Squanto and the First Thanksgiving. Carolrhoda, 1983, grades 3-5
Kinnealy, Janice, Let’s Celebrate Thanksgiving, A Book of Drawing Fun. Watermill, 1988, grades 1-2
Koller, Jackie French, Nickommoh!: A Thanksgiving Celebration. Atheneum, 1999, grades 2-4

Marx, David F., Thanksgiving. Children’s Press, 2000, grades 1-2
McGovern, Ann, The Pilgrims’ First Thanksgiving. Scholastic, 1973, grades 2-up
McMullan, Kate, Fluffy’s Thanksgiving. Scholastic, 1997, grades ps-2
Melmed, Laura Krauss, This First Thanksgiving Day: A Counting Story. HarperCollins, 2001
Metaxas, Eric, Squanto and the First Thanksgiving. Rabbit Ears Books, 1996, grades 1-3
Moncure, Jane Belk, Word Bird’s Thanksgiving Words. Child’s World, 2002, preschool-1

Ochoa, Ana, Sticker Stories: The Thanksgiving Play. Grosset & Dunlap, 2002, grades 1-2
Osborne, Mary Pope, Thanksgiving on Thursday. Random House, 2002, grades 3-5

Parker, Margot, What Is Thanksgiving Day? Children’s Press, 1988, grades 1-2
Peacock, Carol Antoinette, Pilgrim Cat. Whitman, 2004, grades 1-3
Prelutsky, Jack, It’s Thanksgiving. Morrow, 1982, preschool-2

Rader, Laura J., A Child’s Story of Thanksgiving. Ideals Children’s Books, 1998, grades 2-4
Randall, Ronnie, Thanksgiving Fun: Great Things to Make and Do. Kingfisher, 1994, grades 1-3
Raphael, Elaine, and Don Bolognese, The Story of the First Thanksgiving. Scholastic, 1991, grades 1-2
Rau, Dana Meachen, Thanksgiving. Children’s Press, 2000, grades 1-2
Roberts, Bethany, Thanksgiving Mice! Clarion, 2001, preschool-1
Rockwell, Anne, Thanksgiving Day. HarperCollins, 1999
Rogers, Lou, The First Thanksgiving. Modern Curriculum Press, 1962, grades 1-3
Roloff, Nan, The First American Thanksgiving. Current, 1980
Roop, Connie and Peter:
Let’s Celebrate Thanksgiving. Millbrook, 1999, grades 3-5
Pilgrim Voices: Our First Year in the New World. Walker, 1995, grades 3-5
Ross, Katherine, 1995, grades 1-3:
Crafts for Thanksgiving. Millbrook
The Story of the Pilgrims. Random House
Ruelle, Karen Gray, The Thanksgiving Beast Feast. Holiday House, 1999, grades 1-2

San Souci, Robert, N.C. Wyeth’s Pilgrims. Chronicle, 1991, grades 1-3
Scarry, Richard, Richard Scarry’s The First Thanksgiving of Low Leaf Worm. Little Simon, 2003, grades 1-3
Schultz, Charles M., A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. Simon & Schuster, 2002, grades 1-3
Sewall, Marcia, Atheneum, grades 1-3:
People of the Breaking Day. Atheneum, 1990
The People of Plimoth. Aladdin, 1986
Thunder from the Clear Sky. Atheneum, 1995
Siegel, Beatrice, Walker, grades 3-5:
Fur Trappers and Traders: The Indians, the Pilgrims, and the Beaver. 1981
Indians of the Northeast Woodlands. 1992
Silver, Donald M., and Patricia J. Wynne, Easy Make & Learn Projects: The Pilgrims, the Mayflower & More. Scholastic, 2001, grades 3-5
Skarmeas, Nancy J., The Story of Thanksgiving. Ideals Publications, 1999
Sorenson, Lynda, Holidays: Thanksgiving. Rourke, 1994, preschool-2
Stamper, Judith Bauer:
New Friends in a New Land: A Thanksgiving Story. Steck-Vaughn, 1993, grades 1-2
Thanksgiving Fun Activity Book. Troll, 1993, grades 1-4
Stanley, Diane, Thanksgiving on Plymouth Plantation. HarperCollins, 2004, grades 1-3
Stiegemeyer, Julie, Thanksgiving: A Harvest Celebration. Concordia, 2003, grades 2-4

Tryon, Leslie, Albert’s Thanksgiving. Aladdin, 1998, grades 1-3

Umnik, Sharon Dunn, ed., 175 Easy-to-Do Thanksgiving Crafts. Boyds Mills Press, 1996, grades 2-up

Waters, Kate, Scholastic, grades 3-up:
Giving Thanks: The 1621 Harvest Feast. 2001
Samuel Eaton’s Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Boy. 1993
Sarah Morton’s Day: A Day in the Life of a Pilgrim Girl. 1989
Tapenum’s Day: A Wampanoag Indian Boy in Pilgrim Times. 1996
Weisgard, Leonard, The Plymouth Thanksgiving. Doubleday, 1967, grades 1-3
Whitehead, Pat, Best Thanksgiving Book, ABC Adventures. Troll Communications, 1985, grades 1-2

Glowing Review of "The Call of Cthulhu" DVD

Spent this beautiful Indian summer evening watching an amazing film, The Call of Cthulhu. Distributed the Howard Philips Lovecraft Historical Society, directed by Andrew Leman, and written by Sean Branney, The Call of Cthulhu is a triumph of art, literature, and film.

The Call of Cthulhu (Found Among the Papers of the Late Francis Wayland Thurston, of Boston) was written by H.P. Lovecraft in 1928. Lovecraft, a horror writer, amateur astronomer, and blogger (well, actually “amateur journalist”), was first and foremost a poet. The story, which threads the shorter tales The Horror in the Clay, The Tale of Inspector Legrasse, and The Madness from the Sea, was inspired by Lord Tennyson’s The Kraken:

There hath he lain for ages and will lie,
Battening on huge seaworms in his sleep;
Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
Then once by man and angels to be seen,
In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die

And indeed, the entire tale is poetry amidst poetry, as in the narrator’s second-hand description of a third author’s couplet:

Of the cult, he said that he thought the centre lay amid the pathless desert of Arabia, where Irem, the City of Pillars, dreams hidden and untouched. It was not allied to the European witch-cult, and was virtually unknown beyond its members. No book had ever really hinted of it, though the deathless Chinamen said that there were double meanings in the Necronomicon of the mad Arab Abdul Alhazred which the initiated might read as they chose, especially the much-discussed couplet:

That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.

Ironically for a tale by a poet, the movie The Call of Cthulhu is silent. Completely. It is made in the style of a silent movie from 1928. Some music videos over the past few years have tried this style — Red Hot Chili Pepper’s Otherside, for example, and Smashing Pumpkin’s Tonight, Tonight — but none have done it this well. The movie is not knowingly ironic, it is not a comedy, it is not take itself lightly. The Call of Cthulhu is a serious attempt to recreate a horror tale from the 1920s in the style of 1920s Hollywood. It succeeds brilliantly.

That’s why it was a Seattle International Film Festival Selection.


Book Cover

The Call of Cthulhu is the best Lovecraft adaptation I have ever seen, it is the best silent film I have ever seen. The Call of Cthulhu is a masterful executed labor of love. Watch it.

The Call of Cthulhu is available for rent from greencine or purchase from Amazon.com . It runs 47 minutes, and includes an excellent “making of” documentary.

More reviews are available from the HPLHS. A trailer is also available.

Of course, there are humorous adaptations, too.