U.S. Forces to Georgia

The White House’s response is still unaccaptable weak, but at least things are turning the right way.  US ground and naval forces are entering Georgia for “humanitarian” reasons (the same excuse that Russia gave for its invasion).

The US is sending troops to embattled Georgia in the form of a humanitarian aid exercise, President George Bush said.

Mr Bush said military planes would deliver supplies in a move which would put American forces in the heart of the region.

The president said he was concerned that Russia might be violating the ceasefire in Georgia and he expected all Russian forces to withdraw.

He is also sending Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to Paris for talks with EU peacemakers and then to Georgia to express solidarity with the democratically elected government there. Mr Bush said he strongly supported France’s efforts to broker an end to the fighting.

He said the massive US humanitarian effort was already in progress and would involve US Naval forces as well as aircraft.

A C-17 military cargo plane loaded with supplies was on the way, and Mr Bush said that Russia must ensure that “all lines of communication and transport, including seaports, roads and airports,” remain open to let deliveries and civilians through.

The Press Association: Bush sends US troops to Georgia.

We should be preparing to destroy Russian forces that remain in Georgia.  However, even this further protection of the Georgian government is welcome.

8 thoughts on “U.S. Forces to Georgia”

  1. Dan

    Could you please clarify this statement:

    “We should be preparing to destroy Russian forces that remain in Georgia.”

    What do you suppose the Russian reaction might be to having Russian military forces destroyed by American military forces in territory that was part of the Russian Empire for centuries before the Tsar was deposed?

    On a lighter note, here’s a link to the new Russian national anthem.

    http://freepages.music.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~edgmon/cwmarching.htm

  2. I would also like to have a clarification of that statement.

    This is a proposition of the utmost seriousness that shouldn’t be lightly undertaken. At this point there are many other options that have the ability to exert more leverage against Russian interets than military action. Shouldn’t those options against Russia be explored before military action is taken?

  3. Could you please clarify this statement:

    “We should be preparing to destroy Russian forces that remain in Georgia.”

    What do you suppose the Russian reaction might be to having Russian military forces destroyed by American military forces in territory that was part of the Russian Empire for centuries before the Tsar was deposed?

    Presumably similar to Chinese reaction to UN intervention in Korea, or American reaction to sovier-bloc intervention in Cuba.

    I prefer the reggae-inspired rendition of anthem, which may be Putin’s second-greatest-gift to mankind. [1] The most evocative use of the phrase ‘ Marching through Georgia’ sets up the actions of the Stone Dogs.

    Arherring,

    I would also like to have a clarification of that statement

    To rephrase: We should be building our capacity, in all appropriate ways, to execute and sustain the destruction of Russian forces in Georgia, should Russia fail to cease using interstate war as a method of bargaining.

    [1] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrgQ8MNs0zQ
    [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marching_Through_Georgia_(novel)

  4. Assuming diplomatic avenues are being simultaneously pursued, what on the continuum of responses (at the low end being aid of information and armament to the Georgian military, the middle being US signals and air superiority in aid of the Georgian military and at the high end, landing combat forces to execute a ground campaign to expel Russian forces from Georgia proper) what do you think is appropriate in this situation to “execute and sustain the destruction of Russian forces in Georgia”?

    As a side consideration, what do you think of the timing of the ‘cease-fire’ and arrival of US aid into Georgia preventing the Georgian army from effectively organizing a counter-offensive, possibly a 4GW counter-offensive into the contested provinces and into Russia itself? Knowing they can’t hold all of Georgia (much as they probably would like to, was this a lucky break for the Russians or was it their intent to reach this scenario all along?

  5. Aherring,

    Assuming diplomatic avenues are being simultaneously pursued, what on the continuum of responses (at the low end being aid of information and armament to the Georgian military, the middle being US signals and air superiority in aid of the Georgian military and at the high end, landing combat forces to execute a ground campaign to expel Russian forces from Georgia proper) what do you think is appropriate in this situation to “execute and sustain the destruction of Russian forces in Georgia”?

    A ground campaign makes little sense in any case, as we have local allies with superior knowledge of the terrain and language.

    At worse, a re-run of Afghanistan makes sense. Still, it would be best if this can be accomplished with the minimum amount of kinetics needed to protect Georgia’s sovereignty, freedom, and territorial integrity. [1]

    As a side consideration, what do you think of the timing of the ‘cease-fire’ and arrival of US aid into Georgia preventing the Georgian army from effectively organizing a counter-offensive, possibly a 4GW counter-offensive into the contested provinces and into Russia itself? Knowing they can’t hold all of Georgia (much as they probably would like to, was this a lucky break for the Russians or was it their intent to reach this scenario all along?

    I have no special ways of knowing, but Russia still signals that the purpose of its 2GW assault was to remove the Saakashvili. Preventing this from happening is an important first step. (Similarly, the purpose of Russia’s 3GW assault against Ukraine was to remove Yushchenko[2]. That was successfully prevented from happening. [3])

    4GW maneuvers over time and thrives on outrageo, so if there is 4GW retaliation, I don’t think the timing of our arrival would harm it.

    [1] http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=080814143153.wl4ine9y&show_article=1
    [2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viktor_Yushchenko#Dioxin_poisoning
    [3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_Revolution

  6. Dan, I agree with you. We should be ramping up to expel or destroy the Russians now; and, I believe that it is certianly possible without committing US ground forces.

    First, we should be preparing to establish air superiority in Georgia. There should be advanced air defense missile batteries being unloaded right now along with advanced sholder fired anti-aircraft weaponry. Any Russian war plane violating Georgian air space should be shot down. In addition, we should begin patroling Georgian air space and destroy any air or ground assett that trespasses into Georgian territory from Russian territory from this date forward. We should insure air superiority over Georgia.

    The Georgian military should be preparing ambush sites and placing IEDs and mines right now to impede any attempted advance of in-country Russian armor.

    We have the most advanced anti-armor weapons in the world and we should be placing them in the hands of the Georgian military now. If Russian armor does not begin a systematic pull back from Georgian territory by the time the Georgian military is prepared to act, they should begin destroying Russian armor in their territory with this advanced anti-armor weaponry.

    We should also be equiping the Georgian military with advanced surface to surface missiles and artilliry equiped with advanced cluster war heads for use against both armor and personnel.

    And if Russia will not move out, we should say sick’em to the Georgian military and keep the ammunition comming.

    Russia will either get the message that we mean business and move out before it hits the fan or they will get the message quickly with the destruction of a significant amount of of their armor and men. They don’t respect weakness, but they understand strenght and resolve.

    So the question is: do we have the strenght and resolve. Or are we now an impotent and weak willed country without the courage of our convictions.

  7. I’m currently in Germany these days. I don’t see any hoopla or concerns from Europeans as usual. I agree with the supporting Georgian but what about asking more from Europeans? If they are not acting then we should tell them they aren’t rather than accepting the status quo.

  8. Rex A,

    Agreed.

    We understand one another.

    Ray,

    You make a great point about encouraging allies to do more.

    This is an important goal.

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