Tag Archives: sadr

The Iraqis

I like Eddie and his two blogs, Live from the FDNF and Hidden Utilities, a lot. He is one of my friends on shelfy, and (as he served and I did not) he is both braver and stronger than I am. However, one of his comments over at Coming Anarchy illustrates almost everything that is wrong about typical American opposition to the Iraq War:

At a noticeable level, [the execution of former Iraqi PM Saddam Hussein al-Tikriti] was quite like [al Qaeda’s] executions, considering the Sadr militias are guilty of mass murder in the form of ethnic cleansing of innocent civillians, whereas AQ is guilty of mass murder in the form of terrorism (and Saddam guilty of it in both forms as well as systematic rape and indiscriminate use of WMD against civilians). While various forms of evil are certainly not equal, it is the height of hypocrisy for the US to demean and betray itself aligning with one, especially the Mahdi militia.

I’ll concentrate on his accusation that A,erica demaned and betrayed itself by allowing members of Muqtada al-Sadr’s political party from participating in Saddam’s execution.

Excluding supporters of al-Sadr’s party amounts to political blacklisting in a friendly democracy. Among other reasons why this is a terrible, terrible idea:

1. “Blacklists” against members of political parties are in general a bad idea
2. “Blacklists” against members of political parties with elected seats in a national legislature are in general a bad idea
3. “Blacklists” against members of political parties which are part of a democratically elected governing coalition are in general a bad idea.
4. “Blacklists” against allies in the war against Baathism and the war against Qaedism are in geeneral a bad idea

The lack of basic respect for the Iraqi and Iraqi democracy shown by many anti-Iraq-War commentators is astounding.


A Friend, Not a Colony

For nearly a century the majority of Iraqis have suffered from tribal apartheid under a small Sunni clique (comparable in size to the white supremacist government of South Africa). In recent decades the Sunni Arab supremacists escalated the war against their own people to genocidal levels, using mass executions of entire families (such as Mr. Sadr’s), poison gas attacks (such as those against the Kurds), and other tools. After the American libration of Iraq, the Sunni Arab surpemacists responded with terror bombings that the American occupiers either pretended didn’t exist or blamed on the victims.

And once the Iraqi peopl became aware that the American strategy hinged on appeasing terrorists rather than defending civilians or supporting her friends, many (including anti-war commentators) prompted blamed the Iraqi people again for their heroic defense of their families, their communities, their nation. These commentators may or may not believe there is a right to self defense, but apparently not for the Iraqi people.

Too bad.

Kill Baathists. Kill Qaedists. That is Military Victory.

Post-Zarqawi Goals,” by Cliff May, The Corner, 25 June 2006, http://corner.nationalreview.com/post/?q=NDFmYjFmOWY3NDJhOTAyZjIxMDExY2QyY2NmMDg2Nzc=.

Cliff May is talking sense:

The elimination of al-Qaeda commander Abu Musab al-Zarqawi presents an opportunity that should not be missed: Now is the time to take a fresh look at America’s goals in Iraq.

Defeat at the hands of Militant Islamist terrorists and the remnants of Saddam Hussein’s forces would be disastrous.

The consequences would unfold over decades. The perception – and perhaps the reality – would be that the U.S. military, despite its technological prowess and the courage of its troops, is no match for enemies armed with cell phones and garage door openers (used to set off Improvised Explosive Devices), butcher knives and video cameras.

Now is the time to prioritize: The primary goal should be suppression of the forces once led by Zarqawi and Saddam, particularly, in and around Iraq’s capital.

I’ve said similar things before. The upshot: leave Iraq.


In my series entitled Guerrillaz, I used lyrics from the popular song “Clint Eastwood” to demonstrate why we should allow Iraqis to defend themselves.

I’m happy, I’m feeling glad…
I’m useless but not for long:
the future is coming on….
Finally, someone let me out of my cage…
I’m good at repairs…
look, I’ll make it all manageable…
a spiritual hero who appears in you to clear your view…
Gun smokin’, righteous
Allow me…

In the context of Iraq, the “I” are the Kurdish and Shia militias. Current US policy views them as detrimental to success in Iraq, but they are the future of Iraq. They are the energy of a freed people, the protectors against a return to Sunni despotism (whether Baathist or Qaedist). By enabling the majorities of Iraq — the Shia and the Kurds — to run their own country, we transform Iraq into a country that is manageable. The current Bush administration policy of appeasing terrorists creates an unmanageable country. Spiritual Iraqi heroes, from Sistani to Sadr, are the organizing force in Iraq. Instead of attempting to abort the Iraqi political climate by demanding special rights to the Baathist/Qaedist thugs that have destroyed Iraq, we should reward and salute those Iraqis who prevent a Sunni Baathist/Qaedist resurgence. They are gun smoking. They are righteous. And they should be allowed to protect themselves, their homes, and their lands.

A total victory in Iraq — where Iraq becomes “an engine for regional economic growth — will have to rely on the “Reverse Domino Effect.” It will be done through trade, not war. Economic growth first requires security, and that means letting the loyalty militias do their job. That means killing the Baathists and the Qaedists. And that means not confusing friends, who want to kill bad guys, and enemies, who want to kill you.

Oops! We won! Inshallah!

Shiite Iraq,” by Juan Cole, Informed Consent, http://www.juancole.com/2005/02/shiite-iraq-al-hayat-muhammad-husain.html, 18 February 2005.

It’s not often that pro-insurgent ballot boycotts coincide with Monty Pythonesque hilarity, but these are interesting times

In a startling development to which the Western press is paying little attention, the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq has won the provincial governments in 8 of the 18 provinces in the country, including Baghdad. Over-all Shiite lists won 11 of the 18. Sadrists won Wasit and Maysam, and perhaps one other. Dawa doesn’t appear to have run well at the provincial level. The Kurds won several of the northern provinces, including Ta’mim (where Kirkuk is) and Ninevah. The Iraqi Islamic Party won Anbar province, even though it withdrew from the elections. (It couldn’t properly withdraw because the ballots had already been printed.) But only 2 percent of the residents of Anbar voted, so the IIP victory doesn’t mean much.

In l33t speak: 1010^^65^^^135835064^/

Iraq’s Transitional National Assembly Projection

National Assembly Projection,” by “Stephen,” Iraq Election Discussions, http://iraqelect.com/index.php/archives/2005/02/08/national-assembly-projection/, 8 February 2005.

Iraqi ElectionsDiscussions projects the final outcome considerably better than mine.

Seats – Party/List
140 – United Iraqi Alliance (Shi’ite)
68 – Kurdish List
40 – The Iraqi List (PM Allawi)
3 – Natl Elites & Cadres (Moqtada al Sadr)
3 – People’s Union (Communist)
3 – Iraqis List (Pres. al-Yawer)
3 – IMIK (Islamist Kurdish)
15 – Other parties
275 – TOTAL SEATS

Visually,

medium_new_iraqi_assembly_projection.jpg

(Chart courtesy of OpenOffice.org Calc)

Combined, this gives a UIA-Kurdish coalition nearly 76% of the votes in the TNA. Consider the Basic Law’s three-fourths rule, where a Constitution can be created with 75% of the Assembly votes and no need of provincial approval, this could be a very powerful government. Of course, UIA is already a coalition and it’s likely that at least some UIA Assemblymen are sympathetic to either Allawi or Sadr.

It is wonderful to see what the government of a free Iraq looks like. Long live democracy in the Greater Middle East!

Sadr and Happier

Two Iraq cities await elections, Steven Komarow, USA Today, http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/iraq/2005-01-11-cover-usat_x.htm, 11 January 2005 (from Chrenkoff through Iraq the Model).

Austin Bay Writes…,” by Glenn Reynolds, Instapundit, http://instapundit.com/archives/020575.php, 19 January 2005.

As Iraq journeys to becoming a normal county, the Shia have realized: democracy means the end of Sunni tyrant. The Sunni have realized: democracy means the end of Sunni tyrannt.

Sadr City and Fallujah illustrate both the hopes and risks of Iraq’s march toward democracy. One place embraces the politicking; the other ignores it. One sees how a new government could benefit it; the other fears elections will lead to oppression or worse. As the vote approaches, one sees itself as a potential winner. The other’s already lost.

Ironically, through much of the U.S. occupation of the past 21 months, Fallujah and Sadr City have followed parallel paths. Although Fallujah is a Sunni Muslim enclave, a stronghold of deposed dictator Saddam Hussein, and Sadr City is dominated by the rival Shiite sect, both exploded into rebellion against the occupation.

Last April, there was open warfare in both places. Skirmishes raged into the early fall in both. U.S. military convoys regularly were ambushed and troops were killed in both. But then Sadr City’s and Fallujah’s paths diverged. The Shiites have begun embracing elections; many Sunnis fear them.

Now a U.S. officer, Brig. Gen. Jeffery Hammond of the 1st Cavalry Division, says Sadr City is the safest place in or around Baghdad. About 18,000 people have reconstruction jobs, he says, earning about $6 a day. “Sadr City is what the future of Iraq can look like,” he says.

Those who were once taking up arms are now talking democracy. “Before, the men were buying black cloth for their (martyrs’) banners. Now for the election, we are buying white cloths” for posters, says candidate Fatah al-Sheikh.

Now, who in American history do the Salafists-Islamists remind you of…

Craig Henry: “How are the ‘insurgents’ in Iraq different from the KKK in Mississippi circa 1963? And aren’t the nameless election workers who are dying everyday in Mosul and Baghdad heroes like Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner?”

Yes, and there were even people calling the Klansmen “patriots” and comparing them to the Minutemen.

Anti-Arab Violence

Major Fighting in Ramadi, Mosul, Kut: Son of Sistani Aide Killed, al-Khafaji Targeted,” by Juan Cole, Informed Consent,

Al-Abbudi: Sistani Endorses the United Iraqi Alliance,” by Juan Cole, Informed Consent, http://www.juancole.com/2005/01/al-abbudi-sistani-endorses-united.html, 17 January 2005.

Archbishop abducted in Iraq,” BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4182629.stm, 17 January 2005.

The actions of our enemies over the last few weeks have been brutal, calculating, and instructive

They killed the son of an aid to Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani

Ali al-Khatib, son of Sheikh Habib al-Khatib (the representative of Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani in Wasit) was shot down in an internet cafe in Naaman on Sunday. His father had survived an assassination attempt two months ago.

They attacked an associate of Muqtada al-Sadr

Al-Zaman reports that the nephew of Ayatollah Hussein al-Sadr of Kadhimayn was wounded and one of his chiefs of security–Jasim Muhammad al-Saadi– was killed on Saturday. Ayatollah Hussein al-Sadr is the uncle of Muqtada al-Sadr but is pro-American and relatively liberal, unlike the populist, radical Muqtada. Hussein al-Sadr is supporting the list of interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, and his bodyguards and nephew were out putting up posters for his “Iraqiyyah” slate (Allawi’s party was the Iraqi National Accord, but not all the Iraqiyyah candidates are INA). Then they were attacked.

They abducted a Syrian Catholic Archbishop

A Catholic archbishop in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul has been kidnapped by insurgents, the Vatican says.

Archbishop Basile Georges Casmoussa, 66, was abducted from outside his church in the east of the city.

Our enemies of not honorable. They are neither soldiers nor warriors. The Salafists-Ba’athists are using the clan structures of the Sunni Arab minority to fight a tribal war. The civil war in Iraq is a terrorist tribal war.

Why have we disarmed ourselves?

They attack male relatives of Iraqi leaders. They abduct peaceful religious leaders. Why do we not respond in kind? Why do we not immediately arrest for the duration of the tribal unrest all male relatives of every known or suspected Sunni Arab insurgent? Why do we allow friendly religious leaders to be kidnapped, but suffer enemy mosques to exist? Why not give every Sunni mosque seized to Shia leaders, for them to oversee as they wish?

Democracy Now!

Al Sadr warns Bush on poll interference,” Gulf Daily News, http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Story.asp?Article=101899&Sn=WORL&IssueID=27301, 15 January 2005.

Muqtada al-Sadr continues his cries for democracy in Iraq:

BAGHDAD: Radical Iraqi leader Moqtada Al Sadr yesterday urged US President George W Bush and Iraq’s neighbours not to interfere with the January 30 general elections.

“This affair is none of your business,” the young Shi’ite leader said, addressing Bush in a Friday sermon read by one of his representatives at a mosque in his Baghdad stronghold of Sadr City.

“I call on all neighboring and non-neighboring countries, occupiers and non-occupiers, not to meddle in the country’s internal affairs, including the elections,” he said.

The obvious subtext is tht he wants other nations not to interfere in Iraq’s elections. Syria and Saudi oil millionaires are already interfering by supporting the terrorists. Some in Washington want to interfere by giving the Sunnis more seats than the actually win, in an attempt to buy-off the murderers. (Or more politely, “co-opt” them.)

Iraq’s future is Shia-Kurdish. A free election will reflect that. Long live the free Iraq!

The Next Iraqi Government

The New York Times reports on the United Iraqi Alliance, a grand coalition that will certainly be the dominate voice in the new Iraq.

It includes The Dawa Party, The Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, The Mahdi Army (remember when they staged their “uprising”), and The Iraqi National Congress (whose leader, Ahmad Chalabi, is the uncle of the first procsecutor against Saddam for war crimes). For good measure the United Iraqis have some token candidates from minority groups as well.

BAGHDAD, Iraq, Dec. 8 – Iraq’s leading Shiite political groups agreed Wednesday to unite under a single banner, a move that could help them win a dominant share of votes in the coming national elections.

The agreement came as several Sunni parties, including one that led a broad movement to delay the elections for six months, registered to field candidates.

Shiite Arabs, representing 60 percent of Iraq’s population, have long been dominated by the Sunni minority, and they see the elections as a chance to turn their majority status into political power for the first time.

The new coalition, called the United Iraqi Alliance, brings together many of Iraq’s best-known political figures, including the renegade cleric Moktada al-Sadr and Ahmad Chalabi, the former exile once championed by the Bush administration. It is composed mostly of Shiite parties, but also includes Sunnis, Kurds, Turkmens and tribal leaders from across Iraq, in what the organizers hope will be seen as a diverse ticket with broad national appeal.

Relatedly,

News of the agreement came as fighting continued in at least two cities. In Mosul, far to the north, one commando with the Iraqi Interior Ministry was killed and six were wounded in a gun battle that broke out when insurgents attacked a convoy, officials said.

If they wish to reimpose apartheid, the Sunni terrorists need to stop this. The people of Iraq are united for freedom. The Sunni terrorists are on the wrong side of history.